July 29, 2021

Pluritopic Hermeneutics, Polycentricity And Islamic Diplomacy – Rethinking The Praxis Of Modern Diplomacy In Light Of Al-Ghazzal’s Embassy To 18th Century Spain, 1766-1767 (Achraf Idrissi)

Overview The aim of this article is to foreground a praxis of non-Western diplomacy within a rubric of interplay among international relations, cultural representation and intellectual thought. The 18th century Moroccan ambassador Ahmad al-Ghazzal’s diplomatic travelogue The Fruits of Struggle in Diplomacy and War (1776-1777) uncovers a certain segment of the diplomatic universe that has been heretofore overlooked, […]

The Meaning Of January 6, 2021 – Editorial Response I (Roger Green)

The following is the first of a series of responses on the part of the editorial staff of The New Polis to the events of January 6, 2021. In the wake of the events at the Unites States’ Capitol on Wednesday, January 6, 2021, the editorial staff at The New Polis has decided to open […]

Rhetorical Erasure, Indian Slavery, And The Doctrine Of Discovery, Part 1 (Roger Green)

The following is the first of a multi-part series. By far, public discourse in the United States is most frequently framed within a white-black binary.  The legacy of slavery looms large for a union that consciously decided at its founding to perpetuate the so-called “peculiar institution” (as a later defender of slavery termed it).  As Vine Deloria, Jr. complained fifty […]

An Introduction And Call For Submissions To The New Polis On The Doctrine of Discovery (Roger Green)

The New Polis, in conjunction with other Whitestone Publications, is currently at work on a larger project for the year 2021 that involves the publication of articles, online seminars and conferences, and more expansive as well as deep-reaching conversations concerning indigeneity and the “de-colonizing” of prevailing forms of intellectual discourse and cognitive frameworks. The foundational […]

Indigenous Land-Grabbing In Brazil Amid COVID-19 (Roger Green)

A recent article in The New York Times by anthropologist Bruce Alpert relays the story of a fifteen-year-old Yanomami boy, Alvaney Xirixana, who died from Covid-19 earlier this month. He notes that part of the disaster that the Yanomami and other Indigenous Peoples comes from “the absurd negligence of local health services,” and that multiple […]

CoroNations – Notes From The Quarantine (John Panteleimon Manoussakis )

Oedipal Disease A plague has befallen the city. It is the nature of any sickness to reveal what lies hidden under one’s body. For through its symptoms the sickness manifests what has remained invisible, hidden inside the body—or, to be precise, because it is hidden by the body. It is the sick body that allows […]

Is Theological Education Becoming Post-Christian? (Roger Green)

With minimal edits, this post was delivered orally for a panel discussion at The American Academy of Religion at the San Diego Convention Center in November 2019. Tink Tinker asked the author to present a response in line with Tinker’s thinking and scholarship. Tinker had been invited but refused to participate at the conference for […]

Why Sex And Religion Matter In Australian Politics (Paul Tyson)

One might wish that sex and religion be left out of politics as much as possible, but this has not been the case in Australia in recent times. Recall the same-sex marriage plebiscite and various state legislations and Education Department policies around transgender issues for school students. Consider the forthcoming religious liberty legislation promised by […]

What Are We Going To Do With White People? (Tink Tinker, wazhazhe / Osage Nation)

Out of respect for Dr Tinker’s writing style, the editor has chosen to keep the author’s footnotes intact. Readers should know that they often expand and clarify the text in addition to pointing to sources. Readers may also be interested in Tinker’s earlier piece on The New Polis tracing the history of a book of […]

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 5

In this series of posts, I have been reviewing Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno’s Dialectic of Enlightenment from a ‘post secular’ lens.  In my last post, I was tracing the authors’ descriptions of anti-Semitic behavior as “blindness,” and I quipped that this blindness is repositioned by neoliberalism, that it speaks “in no small way” to the rise […]