October 20, 2021

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 5

In this series of posts, I have been reviewing Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno’s Dialectic of Enlightenment from a ‘post secular’ lens.  In my last post, I was tracing the authors’ descriptions of anti-Semitic behavior as “blindness,” and I quipped that this blindness is repositioned by neoliberalism, that it speaks “in no small way” to the rise […]

On The Philosophical Backdrop Of “Alternative Facts” And “Fake News”, Part 2 (Carl Raschke)

The following is the second installment of a two-part series.  The first can be found here.  The article was recently presented at the international meeting of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Phänomenologische Forschung (German Society for Phenomenological Research) in Vienna.  The conference theme was “Fact, Facticity, and Reality”, or how philosophy can understand new media culture. Few scholars […]

On The Philosophical Backdrop Of “Alternative Facts” And “Fake News”, Part 1 (Carl Raschke)

The following is the first installment of a two-part series.  The second installment can be found here.  This article was recently presented at the international meeting of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Phänomenologische Forschung (German Society for Phenomenological Research) in Vienna.  The conference theme was “Fact, Facticity, and Reality”, or how philosophy can understand new media culture. […]

The Technological Transformation Of The Public Square (Joshua Ramos)

We are witnessing the political and cultural transformation of the global public square through internet information technology and digital social media. The public square, once formerly centered around localized, material centers such as town halls, literary café’s and salons, has now become the global virtualized public square, decentralized in transnational internet forums, dispersed through social […]

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 4 (Roger Green)

I have been working through a reading of Max Horkheimer and Thedor Adorno’s classic work of Critical Theory, Dialectic of Enlightenment.  I am particularly interested in the use of literary concepts in their critique.  As we have seen in earlier posts, their first few chapters moved historically, seeing the core of enlightenment in Odysseus as […]

Neoliberalism And The Cultural Politics Of Shame (Samantha Pinson Wrisley)

Shame as an affect, an emotion, or a feeling serves a critical purpose in the construction and maintenance of hegemonic power relations. Sara Ahmed defines it in her book The Cultural Politics of Emotion as an “intense and painful sensation that is bound up in how the self feels about itself (103).” Neoliberalism has deepened […]