November 30, 2022

Impeachment, Hyperpartisanship, And “The Democratic Paradox” (Carl Raschke)

The impeachment circus has now finished playing to Washington town after six months, all the time taxing its motley audience to the outer limits of their attention span.  In the meantime, we came within a hair’s breadth of going to war with Iran, and the novel coronavirus has virtually shut down China while morphing into […]

To Not Lose Sight Of The Good – Notes On The Zapatismo Ethic, Part 2 (Matt Rosen)

The following is the second of a two-part series. The first can be found here. The article is republished from Religious Theory. The recasting of the field of three against the field of two, which is the field that is anterior to it and unilaterally determines it while being foreclosed to what would be its determinations, […]

To Not Lose Sight Of The Good – Notes On The Zapatismo Ethic, Part 1 (Matt Rosen)

The following is the first of a two-part series. The same article appeared previously in Religious Theory. On the first of January 1994, as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) went into effect, the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (Zapatista Army of National Liberation, or EZLN) declared war on the Mexican government from the Lacandon Jungle, […]

Liberal, Republican and Deliberative Democratic Civil Disobedience – The Curious Case Of Edward Snowden, Part 2 (Daniel Muller)

The following is the last of a two-part series. This portion examines the case of Snowden in detail. The first installment can be found here. The Case of Edward Snowden as Deliberative Democratic Disobedience Having covered the core aspects of several theories of civil disobedience, I want now to argue that Edward Snowden’s actions are […]

Liberal, Republican and Deliberative Democratic Civil Disobedience – The Curious Case Of Edward Snowden, Part 1 (Daniel Muller)

The following is the first of a two-part series. The second portion examines the case of Snowden in detail. In his Theory of Justice (1971) John Rawls provides an outline of the conditions of the standard liberal model of civil disobedience about when and how civil disobedience is justified in ‘nearly just’ liberal democracies. While […]

Politics And Its Double – Deleuze And Political Ontology, Part 2 (Borna Radnik)

The following is the second of a four-part series.  The first can be found here. Politics and the Political There is nothing political about ontology if by “ontology” we simply mean the science of being qua being. It may seem presumptuous to declare that ontology has anything to offer political theory, but the turn towards […]

Politics And Its Double – Deleuze And Political Ontology, Part 1 (Borna Radnik)

The following is the first of a four-part series.  Is the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze directly political? There are essentially three possible answers to such a question. First, if the answer to the question is yes, then it is expected that the philosophy either deals explicitly with political concepts, or expresses a certain view regarding […]

Meditations On Aesthetics In The Wake Of The 2019 State Of The Union Address (Roger K. Green)

It is easy to debate the usefulness of commenting on the 2019 State of the Union Address.  In a media sphere mostly concerned with who said what in a fleeting instance, what is the importance of the decorum and epideictic rhetoric surrounding the occasion of the State of the Union and its “strength”? Donald Trump […]

“Democracy Dies By Distinction” – Neoliberalism, Intersectionality, And The Failed Project That Was The Citizens Party (Carl Raschke)

There was a moment in a universe long, long ago and far, far away – specifically, in February, 1980 when I and my now deceased ex-wife attended a “precinct” meeting in Denver of the newly founded Citizens Party – that instilled in me the inescapable realization how democracy invariably dies by distinction. Presumably, there are […]

The Equisapien Encounter – Reading Enrique Dussel In Boots Riley’s “Sorry to Bother You”, Part 1 (Conor Ramón Rasmusen)

The following is the first of a two-part installment. This article contains spoilers for the film Sorry to Bother You. When Boots Riley’s film Sorry To Bother You burst into U.S. theatres this past July, reviewers exclaimed that it was “going off the rails” and “crazy” but was absolutely adored by its viewers. While Riley’s film is both […]