November 29, 2021

The Ontological Violence of Engaged Pluralism (Luke Barnesmoore)

In many cases, by documenting the way settler colonial power ascends to unquestioned normalcy and recirculates as natural and given, the decolonizing project becomes one of suggesting counter realities or alternative ways of knowing and being. – Sarah de Leeuw and Sarah Hunt, “Unsettling Decolonizing Geographies” Introduction It is important to begin this discussion by […]

Panoptical Time and Colonial Framing (Roger Green)

Anne McClintock’s prescient study, Imperial Leather (1995), concluded:  Within the United States, with the vanishing of international communism as a rationale for militarism, new enemies will be found: the drug war, international terrorism, Japan, feminists, the PC hordes and tenured radicals, undocumented workers, lesbians and gays, and any number of international ethnic targets. (395)  While we might swap […]

On Enduring Borders And The Erasure Of Indigeneity, Part 2 (Roger Green)

The following is the second installment of Roger Green’s article.  The first installment can be found here. In my previous post, I argued the necessity of a rigorous notion of Indigeneity if one is going to rethink the polis.  I made this claim in light of Thomas Nail’s impressive Theory of the Border, and I reassert that […]

On Enduring Borders And The Erasure Of Indigeneity, Part 1 (Roger Green)

In this, my first article written specifically for The New Polis, I want to focus on the theme of endurance, particularly as it relates to notions of Indigeneity that I will argue are necessary to the theoretical space of this journal and online platform.  This will be the first of several posts regarding the subject. […]