October 6, 2022

The Revolution Of Respect – The Overlooked Factor In Globalization That Is Driving Everything, Part 2 (Carl Raschke)

The following is the text of the University Lecture given by New Polis editor Carl Raschke for the University of Denver (DU). According to the DU website, “the University Lecturer Award is given in recognition of superlative creative and scholarly work”. This is the second of a two-part transcript. The first can be found here. At the same time, […]

Cosmopolitan Ethics In Glasgow – Reframing Climate Change From A Kantian Perspective, Part 1 (Dianna Able)

The following is the first of a two-part series. The earth has reached a critical point in history. Since the Industrial Revolution, human activity and progress have created so much stress on natural environmental processes that the damage is soon to be irreversible. The ever-rising production of greenhouse gases and over-harvesting of resources threatens our […]

Neoliberalism And The Illusion Of Sovereignty, Part 2 (Carl Raschke)

The following is the second of a three-part series. The first can be found here. With Rousseau, however, the same monopolitical vision was turned upside down and theorized as popular in a manner that rendered the monarch irrelevant.  It is most likely the saturation of French republican thinking on the eve of the Revolution with […]

The Birth Of Modern “Sovereignty” – The Dialectic Of Subjection And Abjection, Part 2 (Carl Raschke)

The following is the second of a two-part series. The first can be found here. It is not incidental that the apologists for these necropolitical regimes as they were in the midst of their formation always considered them “humane” in some ironic, if not perverse, sense of the word.  The Spanish Conquistadors essentially wielded against […]

Escaping Freedom – The Interstitial Politics of Emmanuel Levinas (Joshua Lawrence)

This paper was first delivered at the 2020 Annual Telos-Paul Piccone Institute Conference.          As conceived in a liberal framework, the subject is primarily rational (or at least rational enough) and thus, capable of self-legislating in accordance with a deontological imperative. To some extent, this implies sovereignty, albeit one guarded by conventional strictures that prevent unproductive […]

Race And The Self-Defeating Character of Kant’s Argument In “Anthropology From A Pragmatic Point Of View” (Eunah Lee)

The full PDF version with extensive footnote documentation of Kant’s arguments can be found here. Introduction Kant’s racism has received much attention in recent years. In opposition to the traditional response, which regards his racism as philosophically insignificant, some scholars argue it poses serious philosophical problems. Yet still others acknowledge an “early racism,” but claim […]

The Sociological Deficit Of Contemporary Critical Theory – Axel Honneth’s Theory Of Recognition, Part 4 (Piet Strydom)

The following is the third installment of a four-part series. The first can be found here, the second here, the third here. It is at this juncture, where this particular kind of structure formation occurs, that the second aspect of the cognitive approach of importance for the recovery of the social domain enters. It is the cognitive […]

The Value Of Nature – A Critical Account Of Anthropocentrism In Politics, Part 1 (Anne Fremaux)

The following is part one of a two-part article by Anne Fermaux. If we want to be at home on this earth, even at the price of being at home in this century, we must try to take part in the interminable dialogue with its essence. –Hannah Arendt, “Understanding and Politics” Asking “what is the […]

“Democracy Dies By Distinction” – Neoliberalism, Intersectionality, And The Failed Project That Was The Citizens Party (Carl Raschke)

There was a moment in a universe long, long ago and far, far away – specifically, in February, 1980 when I and my now deceased ex-wife attended a “precinct” meeting in Denver of the newly founded Citizens Party – that instilled in me the inescapable realization how democracy invariably dies by distinction. Presumably, there are […]

Walter Benjamin’s Notes On Various Topics, Part 1

Translated by Rachel Thomas.  Edited  by Carl Raschke. The following is the first part of a series of translated fragments (or “short prose”) from the writings of Walter Benjamin, beginning around the time of World War I.   Some of these fragments, such as the section on the famous “liar paradox” (or “Cretan paradox”) of Epimenides,  […]