January 27, 2022

The Ontological Violence of Engaged Pluralism (Luke Barnesmoore)

In many cases, by documenting the way settler colonial power ascends to unquestioned normalcy and recirculates as natural and given, the decolonizing project becomes one of suggesting counter realities or alternative ways of knowing and being. – Sarah de Leeuw and Sarah Hunt, “Unsettling Decolonizing Geographies” Introduction It is important to begin this discussion by […]

Critical Conversations 6 – On Decoloniality With Walter Mignolo (Victor Taylor, Walter Mignolo)

The following is the video and transcript of the sixth “Critical Conversation”, a monthly Zoom seminar with advance registration sponsored by The New Polis and Whitestone Publications and involving indigenous and international scholars. The seminar took place on Jan. 12, 2020 Roger Green: Good morning, everybody. Thank you for your patience. My name is Roger Green, I’m […]

Racism, Anti-Racism, And Marxism – How Poststructuralism Morphed The Emancipatory Project Into “Progressive Neoliberalism” (Carl Raschke)

The following is the first of a four-part series on the current upsurge in antiracist activism in America as well as its intellectual roots, historical context, and implications. Since the killing of George Floyd untold white people supposedly have all of a sudden discovered something known as “racism.”    Furthermore, this discovery has gone hand […]

Political Filters And The Challenge Of Multivariate Political Analysis (Jonathan Cole)

Political reality is multivariate, although you would never know it based on news reporting, political commentary and the rhetoric of politicians and activists alike. This is because we all, consciously or unconsciously, refract the multivariate political reality we live, or more often observe, through political filters. These filters perform the functional task of reducing complex […]

The Angel Of History And The Ruins Of Paris – Walter Benjamin In France, Part 2 (Emma Fiedler)

The following is the second of a two-part series. The first can be found here. A previous version of this article provided an incorrect name and bio for the author. We apologize for the error. The awareness that they are about to make the continuum of history explode is characteristic of the revolutionary classes at […]

Radical Politics And “The Myth Of The State” (Carl Raschke)

Approximately 75 years ago, as Soviet and Allied armies were converging from opposite directions to crush the demonic dominion of Nazi Germany across Europe, two books were published that would anticipate in remarkable ways the predicament we encounter at the start of the third decade of the third millennium. The first, The Dialectic of Enlightenment […]

The Sociological Deficit Of Contemporary Critical Theory – Axel Honneth’s Theory Of Recognition, Part 2 (Piet Strydom)

The following is the second installment of a four-part series. The first can be found here. Honneth’s Theoretical Solution to the Deficit Parameters of the Reconstruction For the task of reconstructing Honneth’s project of eliminating the sociological deficit of critical theory and eventually arriving at a critical assessment of it, there is no better perspective […]

The Political Enigma Of Jordan Peterson (Jonathan Cole)

The political narrative regarding Jordan Peterson now appears set in stone – he is an ideological warrior of the right. Fans and detractors alike seem to agree on this much. The only residual dispute, still capable of generating enough friction to power a small town, is whether this political identity renders him a messiah or […]

Leszek Kolakowski And The Neo-Platonic Pre-History Of Marxism (Daniel Tutt)

With increasing interest in new forms of Marxism today, from the post-Marxism of Ernesto Laclau and Hardt and Negri, to the value-form analysis of Marxism in the German Neue Marx-Lektüre movement led by the scholar Michael Heinrich, to post-structuralist readings of Marx in philosophers Alain Badiou and Slavoj Žižek, the philosophical origins of Marx’s thought […]

One Divides Into Two – The French Connection Of Mao, May, And Today (Jonathan Fardy)

“One divides into two.” This enigmatic phrase once functioned as the ideological lynchpin of the Cultural Revolution. Maoism redrew the profile of Marxist theory. The dialectic, understood as an ideological and historical process of contradiction and resolution, was central to Maoism as it had been to Marxism and Leninism. But in his writings, especially “On […]