June 30, 2022

Literary Conversations 1 – Steven Dunn and Selah Saterstrom on the Novel, Tragedy And Sacrifice (Roger Green)

In this new series of Literary Conversations, New Polis general editor Roger Green engages with contemporary writers on aesthetic and thematic trends in their work. The initial conversation is posted above, followed by Roger’s reflections on the conversation below the transcript. Steven Dunn is the author of the novels Potted Meat (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2016) and […]

Radical Politics And “The Myth Of The State” (Carl Raschke)

Approximately 75 years ago, as Soviet and Allied armies were converging from opposite directions to crush the demonic dominion of Nazi Germany across Europe, two books were published that would anticipate in remarkable ways the predicament we encounter at the start of the third decade of the third millennium. The first, The Dialectic of Enlightenment […]

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 8 (Roger Green)

In my previous post, I discussed some of the parodic qualities by which the notion of madness occurred in the generation following Horkheimer and Adorno’s Dialectic of Enlightenment. Many readers will easily see the fluid connection with Michel Foucault’s work, and it has been part of my intention in this series of posts to highlight […]

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 7 (Roger Green)

I ended my previous post with the following sentiment. It is certainly worth rejecting Horkheimer and Adorno where they are wrong and not refusing to put them on a pedestal. It is also worth seeing the ways we might formulate our arguments in the twenty-first century within a larger critique of totalitarian impulses that they […]

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 6 (Roger Green)

As I ended my previous post in this series, the postsecular moment has brought with it a broadening of application of the anti-Semitism the Horkheimer and Adorno describe with respect to the literary figure of “the Jew.” It is especially important to note this transposition with respect to current U.S. politics and discussions of neoliberalism. […]

The Sociological Deficit Of Contemporary Critical Theory – Axel Honneth’s Theory Of Recognition, Part 2 (Piet Strydom)

The following is the second installment of a four-part series. The first can be found here. Honneth’s Theoretical Solution to the Deficit Parameters of the Reconstruction For the task of reconstructing Honneth’s project of eliminating the sociological deficit of critical theory and eventually arriving at a critical assessment of it, there is no better perspective […]

The Sociological Deficit Of Contemporary Critical Theory – Axel Honneth’s Theory Of Recognition, Part 1 (Piet Strydom)

The following is the first installment of a four-part series. From his doctoral work published in extended form in 1985 under the title of Kritik der Macht to interviews as late as 2003 and 2009, Axel Honneth repeats the claim that the tradition of Frankfurt School Critical Theory as a whole suffers from what he […]

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 5

In this series of posts, I have been reviewing Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno’s Dialectic of Enlightenment from a ‘post secular’ lens.  In my last post, I was tracing the authors’ descriptions of anti-Semitic behavior as “blindness,” and I quipped that this blindness is repositioned by neoliberalism, that it speaks “in no small way” to the rise […]

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 4 (Roger Green)

I have been working through a reading of Max Horkheimer and Thedor Adorno’s classic work of Critical Theory, Dialectic of Enlightenment.  I am particularly interested in the use of literary concepts in their critique.  As we have seen in earlier posts, their first few chapters moved historically, seeing the core of enlightenment in Odysseus as […]

The Dialectic Of Enlightenment From A Postsecular Lens, Part 3 (Roger Green)

In my previous post, I took a turn from direct analysis of Dialectic of Enlightenment to engage with David Scott’s writing on tragic disposition in Conscripts of Modernity.  I then focused on Emmanuel Levinas’s early essay, “Reality and Its Shadow.”  I merged Levinas’s pessimism concerning art and his call for a distinctive kind of criticism with […]